Joe Burns – Elucidat https://www.elucidat.com Mon, 01 Jun 2020 10:01:41 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.0.2 Introducing the new WYSIWYG Layout Designer in Elucidat https://www.elucidat.com/blog/layout-designer-update/ Mon, 16 Apr 2018 16:40:15 +0000 https://www.elucidat.com/?p=4394 Being able to create customizable page layouts for your elearning is key to bringing your design concepts to life. We’ve listened to our user feedback, and have released an exciting update to Layout Designer that makes building custom pages in Elucidat a whole lot easier and more efficient. First, what is Layout Designer? Layout Designer […]

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Being able to create customizable page layouts for your elearning is key to bringing your design concepts to life. We’ve listened to our user feedback, and have released an exciting update to Layout Designer that makes building custom pages in Elucidat a whole lot easier and more efficient.

elucidat layout designer icon

First, what is Layout Designer?

Layout Designer allows you to create your own templates and page layouts in Elucidat. With simple drag and drop functionality, you can build your pages exactly as you’d like them. You can then share these as templates with your team, supporting them to create consistently high-quality designs.

What’s the difference between Layout Designer and Author Mode?

While Layout Designer helps you to create the template and structure for your content, Author Mode allows you to input the actual content.

How has Layout Designer been improved?

Author Mode has always been WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get), but the original Layout Designer tool didn’t give you visibility of both the content and design being worked on.

Quite rightly, Elucidat users have highlighted that this made it tricky to know what’s what when you’re adding and moving Parts in Layout Designer.

So, we’ve released a big update to make Layout Designer WYSIWYG too! It now reflects the content you’re working on in Author Mode, helping to speed up your production process.   

With Layout Designer you can now:

  • See content added in Author Mode
  • See images, audio and video displayed
  • See style changes reflected in Layout Designer
  • Duplicate ‘Parts’, including the edits

Imagine you’ve already added text and image content in author mode, but then decide you want to change the width of your columns or even add a video. Now, when you switch to Layout Designer, you can re-design and modify the overall layout and still see the content you’re working on within the page. Awesome, right?

Watch this video for more detail on the improvements we’ve made:

If you already use Elucidat, login now to try Layout Designer!

Not using Elucidat yet?  Start your free trial.

 

 

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The 6 Most Misunderstood Myths About Mobile Learning https://www.elucidat.com/blog/6-myths-about-mobile-learning/ Sat, 02 Jul 2016 23:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/6-myths-about-mobile-learning There are so many (irritating!) myths surrounding mobile learning. We love mobile learning and hate to see it get a bad press, so we’ve made a quick roundup of 6 mobile myths that we feel are the biggest offenders and then present the case against them. If you’d like to learn why mobile learning is […]

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mythbusters-mobile-learning

There are so many (irritating!) myths surrounding mobile learning.

We love mobile learning and hate to see it get a bad press, so we’ve made a quick roundup of 6 mobile myths that we feel are the biggest offenders and then present the case against them.

If you’d like to learn why mobile learning is cheaper, safer and more accessible than you have been led to believe, read on!

Myth #1: You cannot condense real learning into a 320 x 480p screen

Mobile learning has been around long enough to have developed mechanisms that allow users to acquire rich information in brief sessions.

This may soon become a moot point, as, since the adoption of tablets, there has been a reversal in the trend of shrinking screen sizes, with newer phones getting progressively larger.

Key takeaway

  • Small screens easily compete with desktops and provide you with just as much information. If you still don’t believe me, why not have a look at this example on your phone, or drag the corner of your browser window like this:

Myth #2: Mobile learning requires some serious dollars

Mobile learning, in many cases, lowers hardware costs as either your staff can source equipment themselves or they can be given a phone at a fraction of the cost of traditional platforms.

Not only is mobile learning cheaper, but also you can pass the savings on to your clients. A growing number of people are hosting online field trips to save money and ‘in many instances, the mobile data costs are cheaper than say paper and ink alternatives.’

With mobile technology, there is no fixed location. This immediately cuts the costs of real estate for both developers and institutions.

Key takeaway

  • With mobile learning you will considerably lower your costs.

Myth #3: Mobile learning is risky

Yes, mobile devices are more likely to be stolen than desktop computers, but they do also have several additional security features, and there is a plethora of Apps available for iOS and Android devices that can be used to safeguard your organization’s information (click here for some great examples).

In addition to this, for the majority of LMS providers: ‘SSL use is common (though not necessarily enforced), passwords are always encrypted and cloud-based LMS providers rarely store credit card information.’

Many people now argue that mobile learning is in fact safer than desktop learning.

The safest option to protect your learning is cloud-based technology, where courses are delivered on demand rather than being stored on the device. This means, as compared to an app, that courses can be turned off remotely, and nothing is stored on the app in question. This means that you retain control.

Key takeaway

  • Mobile learning is safe provided you choose the correct platforms and your staff are diligent.

Myth #4: Mobile devices are unsuitable for learning as they are a distraction

Learner distraction is hardly a recent phenomena, classrooms have always had their lures, and even a desktop computer that has been stripped down to only basic programs has potential diversions (who hasn’t whiled away a few hours in MS Paint when they should be working hard?)

While yes, there is the potential for distraction, mobile learning can be done at home and is free from the distractions and stresses of the workplace.

According to Ron Yaros, assistant professor of new media and mobile journalism at the University of Maryland’s Philip Merrill College of Journalism, one of the best ways to remove distractions is to encourage users to work on tablets or phones. He explains that this is because, ‘The laptop can open multiple windows, which makes it a potential distraction, as few students can resist the temptation to open up windows in the course of a 70-minute lecture’ and because phones can open only one at a time.

Key takeaway

  • The freedom of mobile technology allows you greater control over your, and your learners’ environment, the single-window device — the phone or tablet — will get you closer to success in the classroom.

Myth #5: Students with disabilities cannot use mobile devices for learning

Apple iOS is built with numerous Accessibility features, including captioning, voice over and speech functions. Android also encourage developers of Apps to be conscious of accessibility requirements. There is now mobile learning software that provides full support for screen readers and voiceover, has well-crafted semantic HTML5 to help learners understand the structure of all pages, and allows the entry of text alternatives to assist learning.

Mobile technology brings materials directly into your learner’s home, what could be more convenient?

According a Recent paper by UNESCO:

“Mobile technologies can deliver flexible and personalized learning experiences that meet the unique and varied needs of disabled learners in ways that traditional education resources and ICT cannot.”

Key takeaway

  • Embracing mobile technology is an important step in creating an inclusive, modern workplace.

Myth #6: Mobile learning is the same as traditional learning, only portable

Yes, a key selling point of mobile learning is that it is portable, but an overlooked feature of mobile learning is how this portability exposes learners to different contexts.

The context and environment of mobile learning are in constant flux allowing it to be both an extension and an accompaniment to traditional educational distributions. Learning benefits from many of the unique attributes of mobile technology such as portability, social interactivity, context sensitivity, connectivity, and individuality.

With mobile learning, your learner’s context can vary from a mundane commute or waiting in a queue to a more relevant environment or a scenario based situation.

Key takeaway

Mobile learning feels less like learning (although the reality is closer to ‘you’re never out of the classroom!’) and allows your user to be continually exposed to fresh perspectives and personalized content.

At Elucidat we eat, sleep and breathe multi-device learning. Our team has done the research and hard work solving the technical challenges so you don’t have to. 

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How to overcome the top 5 HTML5 elearning challenges https://www.elucidat.com/blog/top-5-html-elearning-challenges/ Thu, 30 Jun 2016 23:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/top-5-html-elearning-challenges Before the emergence of HTML5 elearning authoring tools, I regularly found myself in situations where I poured my heart and soul into amazing content (if I do say so myself!) using legacy authoring tools – only to find that it didn’t work at all on the client CEO’s iPad or personal tablet. (Quick refresher – HTML5 is […]

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html5 elearning challenges

Before the emergence of HTML5 elearning authoring tools, I regularly found myself in situations where I poured my heart and soul into amazing content (if I do say so myself!) using legacy authoring tools – only to find that it didn’t work at all on the client CEO’s iPad or personal tablet. (Quick refresher – HTML5 is a programming language that allows you to author elearning that will work on web and mobile.)

Thankfully, with the latest authoring tools, this is becoming less and less an issue.

Whether it’s flexible, hassle-free user experiences, greater consistency among web browsers, or easy-access mobile resources, there are many reasons HTML5 is the future of elearning.

Nevertheless, we’ve found from experience that it does have its share of pitfalls.

To help you avoid them when you’re creating HTML5 elearning, we’re going to work through some of the most crucial considerations, potential snags, and most important, their solutions.

Challenge #1: Media format issues

Back in the days of Flash, we could get away with using only a couple of media formats.

Current tech is plug-in free, which allows greater mobile learning experiences, but can cause issues with media formats, as different browsers use different formats.

According to Adobe: “Now, since you can embed audio and video directly in the HTML5 code, you can run content on mobile devices, such as tablets and mobile phones, without relying on third-party plug-ins or applications. This is a critical hurdle cleared, since many people want to view e-learning content on a mobile device rather than on a desktop system.”

This means it is wise to use a couple of formats to accommodate different browsers and crucially different internet connections. A few extra minutes setting up formats for different browsers has paid dividends for me and prevented potential frustration from learners.

An easier way to avoid format issues when creating your elearning courses is to use a tool with a built in HTML player (such as Elucidat, which uses MediaElement.js); it works with all the main browsers (most old browsers too) and requires only a single upload.

Key takeaway: Invest in tools that take care of encoding for you and that use a video player that is compatible with multiple browsers.

Challenge #2: Browser compatibility

HTML performance depends upon your browser’s compatibility. In the old days, you’d install a clunky Flash plug-in, which would allow interactions to work in most browsers (with a little patience and persuasion).

Now all you need is an HTML5-ready browser, which is super simple – go for ChromeIE 10-11, or Firefox. Having a great browser and using cloud-based authoring tools – such as Elucidat – will stop you from clogging up your computer with software.

Many organizations insist on older (non-HTML5) browsers for safety and compliance when creating desktop-centric courses. This makes it vital to create fallbacks that automatically convert your HTML5 work for older browsers. MediaElement.js and Modernizr enable you to move forward with confidence.

This handy/visually dazzling interactive diagram shows you how browsers have transformed during the past 6 years.

htm5-css-elearning-readiness

Key takeaway: Browser compatibility for new and legacy browsers has vastly improved and continues to improve – just remember to offer alternatives for older browsers.

Challenge #3: HTML5 code is viewable

With HTML5, the user’s computer renders the files. This means you can view JavaScript, CSS, and HTML. This is great if you’re learning to code and want to see how the big boys work, but not so great when it comes to protecting your intellectual property.

To combat code copying, some developers “minify” their work, which involves removing all unnecessary characters from the source code without changing its functionality, making it difficult for content to be copied easily.

This is quite time consuming and possibly a little heavy handed. I’ve found that a better practice is to use both authoring software and learning management systems, which allow you to control who can view your projects and protect your content.

Key takeaway: Take steps to protect your work and invest in tools that allow you to restrict access to materials.

Challenge #4: HTML5 standards

As an emergent technology, HTML5 standards are subject to change.

Keeping up with browser updates and specification changes is a real pain though – and keeps you away from making great content. You should leverage a tool that can update to the latest technologies automatically, as Elucidat does.

Key takeaway: HTML5 standards may continue to change – choose an authoring tool that will future-proof your work.

Challenge #5: Capability for animation

For many of us, animations are vital to creating engagement in elearning. HTML5 doesn’t use the same Flash-based technology, and this can cause some issues when viewing animations on older browsers.

In the past, there weren’t many options for creating HTML5 animations, but now there are some awesome new animation tools available and in development.

Good HTML5-based apps (such as Elucidat) have animation options built in.

Key takeaway: There are a lot of easy ways to create new content and to convert your existing content to HTML5.

Final thoughts

At Elucidat, we’re passionate about helping people create better, more future-proof HTML5 elearning. We’d love to introduce you to a world of greater elearning flexibility; contact us today.

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Interview with Elearning Superstar: Charles Jennings https://www.elucidat.com/blog/charles-jennings-interview/ Thu, 18 Jun 2015 12:00:32 +0000 https://blog.elucidat.com/?p=1239 It’s that time again where we get to share with you the wisdom of one of our Elearning Superstars, this week, a man who needs little introduction, Charles Jennings, a fountain of learning knowledge and all round great guy! If at any point in my career, my CV looks as comprehensive as his I will […]

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It’s that time again where we get to share with you the wisdom of one of our Elearning Superstars, this week, a man who needs little introduction, Charles Jennings, a fountain of learning knowledge and all round great guy! If at any point in my career, my CV looks as comprehensive as his I will be very pleased!

In the post you will learn how 70:20:10 was devised, discover the changes this model is undergoing due to social learning, and explore the new possibilities of collaborative learning.

charles jennings elearning interview

What experience do you have in the learning industry, how did you get to where you are today?

I’ve been working in the world of learning for around about 35 years at least. Initially as an academic, I ran the UK centre for network based learning back in the 1980s and into the 90s. That was set up by the Thatcher government, they realised that with the development of the PC that it was going to have implications beyond the uses of computer geeks. So a number of centres of excellence were set up in academic institutions, universities around the country. There was one for computer aided language learning, one for expert systems, one for artificial intelligence and there was one that I ran which was for network based collaborative learning.

I was involved in online learning back in the early 80s, in fact I ran my first online learning course in 1982 and then my first international learning course in 1984 which was between people in the UK, France and Germany. I can remember having one of the first video conferencing machines on my desk back in the 80’s! BT were rolling out ISDN based video conferencing and they used to call me up every few weeks and get my view of it. They’d ask for improvements and I’d tell them ‘Just put this inside my computer please!’.

I left academia in 95, we’d launched the World’s first pure online MBA. I then went and worked for Dow Jones as strategic technology director involved in helping build workforce capability doing a number of things, one was creating transaction tools but also helping sales and marketing build capabilities through what I suppose was very early E-learning and performance support.

I was the chief learning officer at Reuters for 8 years, until 2008. Since then I’ve worked as a consultant, I established the 70:20:10 forum, but I subsequently left that organisation and now have nothing to do with it.

What is the 70:20:10 model and how can it help customers improve the effectiveness of their learning, which metrics do you believe are most important in measuring this?

70 20 10 model

70:20:10 I think is often misunderstood, first I see it often referred to as a rule, which it’s not. I see people focussing in on the numbers, it’s natural to focus on the numbers because that’s (what it is) basically how it’s described70:20:10 is what I call a reference model or a framework, we’ve come to it in various ways, principally from a small study based on work done in the late 80’s and published in the mid 90’s at the Centre for Creative leadership in North Carolina. There was a small survey that Morgan McCall and his colleagues carried out and they asked a group of successful managers:

  • ‘How did you get to where you are?’
  • ‘What development made you successful?’

From the responses they formed the model. Successful people said about 70% of their learning came from tough assignments, experience and practice, 20% came from other people (at that time this was mainly the boss, now the way that organisations are structured and thanks to the Internet this has changed a lot). 10% came from structured formal learning and reading.

There was also work before this study by Allen Tough who was a professor at the University of Toronto, he did a lot of work around experiential learning and adult learning. I spoke to Allen just before he died, he agreed that this split existed (he even came up with the same figure of 70% for people learning through experience).

For me the 70:20:10 model is a ‘Change’ model, and what it does is it allows people to frame how they support development above and beyond structured courses and programmes, that’s really the key benefit. It helps us communicate that we don’t learn everything we need to for our jobs simply by attending a classroom course. In fact we learn primarily through experience, practice conversations and networks.

In the past I’ve been accused of being the ‘Anti-training’ guy! Well I’m not ‘Anti-training’, where I’m coming from is that training works well in certain situations, usually when people are new to a job or new to a role, it works best when you have information that is explicit and which can be codified clearly. It doesn’t work well when we deal with ‘tacit’ information, where we are dealing with ambiguity, or where we have people who need immediate support.

70:20:10 is a model for extending learning across the board, it helps us move from a focus on learning to a focus on performance.

In terms of metrics, the metrics we use for measuring workplace and social learning are exactly the same as those we should be using for learning in a structured way. We could talk for hours about simply the metrics! The sort of metrics we should be focussing on should be output metrics and not learning metrics. Learning metrics are helpful to an L and D or HR department to improve efficiency. So if I know X number of people have been through an e-learning programme, or if I know that people have carried out a pre-test and then a post-test and there’s a delta there, that tells me as a learning professional something about whether people are actually using the content, but it doesn’t tell us anything about learning.

If someone gets 20% in a pre-test and 40% on the post-test don’t assume that’s learning, it’s short term memory recall. Learning is behaviour change, and this should be the most important metric, can people do their jobs better? That’s quite difficult to measure and often people shy away from that.

What excites you most about what you do and the affect your work has? What are the most gratifying ideas that you’ve contributed to the industry?

That’s very difficult, I doubt there’s many new ideas out there anymore! I think that what excites me the most is that there is a real change occurring in that across the world organisations are looking at how they build capability. It really has changed. I remember being told I was an idiot back in the 90s when we were working on online collaborative learning. I remember doing a project with Coopers and Lybrand (before they were PWC) where we were putting together groups of people to share and develop as part of their work.  Most people in the learning world said ‘What the hell is this, this is nothing to do with learning’!

That’s changed dramatically, it’s really exciting that social media is pushing the opportunity to learn through others. At some point I believe that the numbers in 70:20:10 will become meaningless, because social learning will grow, there is no doubt. If you’re in a highly innovative Environment this model won’t be the same, the 20% is going to blow up because you will be sharing and working with teams of people, that’ll be 40, 60, 80% and then the 10% may become much less. The whole awareness of social and experiential learning is really taking hold, it’s not a sideshow anymore, it’s becoming part of the mainstream.

There’s a guy called Dan Pontefract who’s written a book called ‘Flat Army’ and in that Dan proposed that 70:20:10 is actually 33:33:33, we’ll ignore the fact that if you multiply 33 by three you don’t get a hundred! But Dan and I agree that it’s not about the numbers, the fact that the numbers are there makes it really easy to explain.

What is the most important change in learning that you’ve witnessed in the last couple of years?

Definitely the rise of social media, the increase of social media at a personal level is having an impact. Most of us use social media from a personal standpoint and therefore it changes our expectations. I often tell a story about someone at a legal firm, she’s a big Twitter user and she said her company didn’t allow Twitter, so when asked ‘How does that work!?’ she said, if I have a question I’ll go to the ladies loo and Tweet my question, and then go back an hour later and I’ll have an answer! I think the big change is the awareness of how social media can be used at all sorts of levels has changed, the approach in term of control of social media is going. Organisations are no longer blocking social media, because everyone now has a device than can access social media regardless of restrictions. So now their approach is more policy based approach to ensure their people use social media sensibly and don’t damage the company. They’ve moved from trying to control the technology to control through the policy.

Bursin did a study that showed that organisations that harnessed social learning are actually 3X better at talent development.

Do you think companies have been slow to make the change?

The majority have, there are some that have acknowledged it from the start though. I can remember going on a mission when the Department of Trade and Industry almost 10 years ago. They used to send experts to different parts of the world to gather information on the behalf of UK PLC. We went on a mission to the US in 2006 called ‘Beyond e-learning’. We went down Silicon Valley, we went to Stanford University, MIT and we also went to Fidelity the huge financial organisation in Boston, the guys we met said ‘We couldn’t have grown without all this new technology’.

What are the biggest project challenges / roadblocks that learning professionals and corporations regularly encounter?

Mindset is the first and biggest challenge, I think there are still a lot of people who have ‘Course’ mindsets, in other words they look a problem and their kneejerk response to that is ‘we need a course for that’. Another major challenge for learning professionals is that most learning professionals have quite naturally developed their skills in design, development, delivery and to some extent evaluation of programmes and the changes that are occurring are requiring a new set of skills. If you are well into your career and you’re are required to have different skills such as performance consulting skills, curation skills, community building skills, these sorts of capabilities are really quite difficult. I found that for L & D professionals there’s some roadblock there.

The other roadblocks with line managers and team leaders who don’t see developing the people is critical. There is a lot of research that indicates that supporting an individual’s development is worth the equivalent of an extra day a week (around about 25-27%).

Who are your favourite elearning influencers? Who do you look to for inspiration?

Oh god that’s difficult! It’s difficult to name individuals, but across the board there’s a range of organisations who are just doing things differently.

I think you get some people like Clarke Quinn who really understands mobile learning deeply and has really helped progress mobile adoption.

Jane Hart, Jane Bozarth and Marcia Connor, those three women have done more in terms of raising awareness of social learning and the use of technology than pretty much anyone!

Then there are some great practitioners like Thierry Bonetto at Danone, Yash Mahadik at Philips, and then there are people like Nigel Paine who is really influential in terms of thinking about how we support development.

Then there are folks who might wince at being called superstars, but people like John Hagel and John Seely Brown who are not learning people primarily, but they’re looking at new revolutions in the way that we learn. John Seely Brown was the head of Xerox PARC for twenty years, he’s deeply technical, he oversaw the development of the PC and the mouse, he wrote a great book with John Hagel called ‘The Power of Pull’ and another one called ‘New culture of learning’. People like them are really being influential in terms of how we look at learning generally.

I think one of the challenges we’ve got with e-learning is that when it emerged, it emerged in the form of content led courses, companies were producing big generic catalogues, people realised that providing this Shovelware isn’t good. In my view the term E-learning will go away, I have a little thing stuck above my desk here, which was written about ten years ago by Warren Edwards chief executive of Delphi communications: ‘in a few years we will no more discuss e-commerce than we now describe using the telephone in business as t-commerce or the fax as f-commerce.’

I think in time we will no longer be referring to E-learning or M-learning, it’ll just be learning. Technology is going to be integrated totally.

Conclusion

What do you think? Do you share Charles’ views over the future of the industry? What do you think are the most important recent changes in E-learning? Share your thoughts in the comments box below, we’d love to hear what you think.

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New ‘Projects’ and ‘Releases’ page https://www.elucidat.com/blog/new-projects-and-releases-page/ Mon, 04 May 2015 23:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/new-projects-and-releases-page This month we’ve changed how the ‘Your Projects’ and ‘Releases’ pages work. Let’s take a look at what we have changed: Projects Tags In the ‘Projects’ page you can now tag projects, this is very handy for organising your projects. So for example if I wanted to have all of my colleague Bill’s projects grouped […]

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This month we’ve changed how the ‘Your Projects’ and ‘Releases’ pages work.

Let’s take a look at what we have changed:

Projects

Tags

In the ‘Projects’ page you can now tag projects, this is very handy for organising your projects. So for example if I wanted to have all of my colleague Bill’s projects grouped together, I could create a tag for ‘Bill’, and when Bill wishes to view his projects he can click the ‘Bill’ tag.

To create a tag press the section that says ‘Enter project tags here’, displayed below the project title:

Add a name and press enter.

Your new tag will appear, it will look a little something like this:

At the top of the page there is a tags section where you will be able to access all of your tags:

Once you click a tag, only the courses with that specific tag assigned to them will be displayed.

If you wish to reset the tags to the default settings press ‘Reset filters’.

Previews

You can now ‘Preview’ your course before opening, to preview your project press ‘Show previews’:

Icons

In the projects page you will now be able to see several icons:

– This icon will display once you have created a release from a project.

– This icon will display once you have created a release from a project, if you hover over the icon it will tell you how many times the course has been viewed.

– This icon will display once a comment has been added to a course.

Archiving projects

When you press the ‘Delete’ (X) button on a project you will now have the option to delete your project entirely or to archive your project.

Archiving your project will mean that you project is accessible in future.

Releases page

We’ve updated the releases page so that you can see how many course views your course has had, you can also see your release progress in real time.

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Adding a ‘Tooltip’ https://www.elucidat.com/blog/adding-a-tooltip/ Thu, 30 Apr 2015 23:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/adding-a-tooltip This week we added a ‘Tooltip’ feature, with the tooltip feature you can add a prompt that appears when your learner hovers over a text area. Like this! Tooltips are helpful for providing your learners with additional information and prompts, they’re also very handy for providing your learner with additional references. To add a Tooltip […]

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This week we added a ‘Tooltip’ feature, with the tooltip feature you can add a prompt that appears when your learner hovers over a text area.

Like this!

Tooltips are helpful for providing your learners with additional information and prompts, they’re also very handy for providing your learner with additional references.

To add a Tooltip

Find an area of text that you would like to add your tooltip.

Double click the text to open the text editor:

Select the text you’d like to add the tooltip to:

Press the link button:

Press ‘Insert Tooltip’:

Enter the text that you would like to be displayed:

…and press ‘Insert’.

Now when you hover over your text your tooltip will display.

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Wax LRS https://www.elucidat.com/blog/using-wax-lrs/ Mon, 13 Apr 2015 23:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/using-wax-lrs Wax LRS is a superb LRS that we would like to draw to your attention which can be used with our xAPI/Tincan mode (if you’re not sure what xAPI is click here). What advantages are there with using an LRS (or Learning Record Store)? Well using an LRS saves your learners from the hassle of […]

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Wax LRS is a superb LRS that we would like to draw to your attention which can be used with our xAPI/Tincan mode (if you’re not sure what xAPI is click here).

What advantages are there with using an LRS (or Learning Record Store)? Well using an LRS saves your learners from the hassle of logging in to an LMS, allowing for a much less formal learning experience and easier mobile access for learners. You’re also able to use an LMS at the same time if you need to kill two birds with one stone!

Another great advantage with an LRS is the amount of in depth information that you can receive which allows you to really pinpoint problem areas in your courses.

You can also use this information to integrate other apps with your work, for example Salesforce.

Wax LRS in use

Here’s a few examples I have found of handy ‘Out of the box’ behaviour in Wax LRS.

You can immediately see how questions are being answered, you can do this for all of your learners or for a specific learner:

You can immediately see how your learners are performing:

A really nice touch is that you can embed the information from your dashboard with ‘Embed me!’ button:

Test different ‘Employee’ competencies by testing for different rules:

Set up Wax LRS

After logging in to Wax, press the ‘Settings’ button

Firstly in the section titled ‘API Information’, take note of the ‘Endpoint URL’:

Then scroll down to the ‘Credentials’ section:

Press ‘Create New Basic’, a new ‘Consumer key’ and ‘Secret key’ will be generated, make a note of these.

Now head over to Elucidat and open a scored course that you would like to have reporting to your LRS (if you would like more info on how to create a scored course click here).

Press ‘Configure’ to open the ‘Page settings’ menu.

Add your ‘Endpoint URL’ to the section called ‘LRS Endpoint URL you will also need to append the URL with ‘/statements’, for example:

Add your ‘Consumer Key’ code to the section that says ‘LRS Username’.

Add your ‘Secret key’ code to the section that says ‘LRS Password’.

Now let’s look at setting the ‘Learner access control’, in LRS mode this must be set to either ‘Identify’ or ‘Restricted’.

…now your LMS settings are ready, release your course as an ‘Online’ release and take a look at your course.

You should start to see statements in Wax LRS almost immediately.

 

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To change LRS email and ‘Log-in screen’ https://www.elucidat.com/blog/to-change-lrs-email-and-welcome-screen/ Sun, 12 Apr 2015 23:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/to-change-lrs-email-and-welcome-screen Before your learner gets started with a course that is using LRS mode they will see a ‘log-in’ screen where they must enter their name and their email address: By default this already looks pretty spiffy… but in a few cases we’ve found that editing the layout of this screen is necessary, for instance if […]

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Before your learner gets started with a course that is using LRS mode they will see a ‘log-in’ screen where they must enter their name and their email address:

By default this already looks pretty spiffy… but in a few cases we’ve found that editing the layout of this screen is necessary, for instance if you wish to change the language of the text.

Well now it’s really easy to change! Here’s how:

Open the course

Press ‘Configure’ and then press ‘Learner tracking’:

Scroll down the screen, you should already have the ‘Learner access control’ set to ‘Identify’, as this is required when in the LRS mode, which will mean that you can see a screen similar to this:

In here there are several options:

1.) Edit log-in page – This setting will allow you to edit the log-in page using Elucidat’s WYSIWYG interface, like so:

2.) Invitation email subject – This is the subject of the email that your receive will learn once they have submitted their name and email address to the ‘Log-in’ page, by default it is called the project name, plus ‘invitation’.

3.) Invitation email content – This is the content of your email, if you leave this blank it will display:

Hi there ,

Your unique link for is here:

…press ‘Save changes’ when you are ready.

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New ‘Graphs’ feature https://www.elucidat.com/blog/new-graphs-feature/ Tue, 07 Apr 2015 23:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/new-graphs-feature This week we’ve added a feature to allow you to make a Graph using information from any questionnaire page in your project. Graphs create richer learning by making it possible for learners to see how their peers feel. To use the ‘Graphs’ feature Open a project with a scored questionnaire, or add a scored questionnaire […]

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This week we’ve added a feature to allow you to make a Graph using information from any questionnaire page in your project.

Graphs create richer learning by making it possible for learners to see how their peers feel.

To use the ‘Graphs’ feature

Open a project with a scored questionnaire, or add a scored questionnaire to an existing project, click here if you’re not sure how to set a page to be scored.

Next, open the page which you would like the ‘Graph’ to be displayed on.

Double click a text field.

Click the ‘Graphs’ button in the text editor:

The ‘Insert Graphs’ pop up will appear:

Choose the page that you would like to set as scored from the ‘Page to graph results from’ dropdown (in this case it was page ‘11’) and then choose the ‘Graph type’ you would like.

Press ‘Insert’.

Now when your course is viewed in an LMS your graph will appear and you will be able to see information on how your peers answered.

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Adding funky scoring! https://www.elucidat.com/blog/adding-funky-scoring/ Mon, 23 Mar 2015 00:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/adding-funky-scoring This week I thought I’d show you how to add funky scoring to your work! This is a great way of giving your learner gamified feedback. Rather than having a boring ‘You have achieved 100%’ you can display ‘You have received 30000 points!’ To begin with I built out my course structure using the Get […]

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This week I thought I’d show you how to add funky scoring to your work!

This is a great way of giving your learner gamified feedback.

Rather than having a boring ‘You have achieved 100%’ you can display ‘You have received 30000 points!’

To begin with I built out my course structure using the Get Started wizard.

I built the course with three scored pages and 1 feedback page:

To begin with I added question and answer text to my Scored pages and set which of my answers was correct (if you are unfamiliar with how to do this see here).

I set the page to be scored by opening ‘Page settings’, choosing the ‘Scoring & completion’ tab and then choosing either ‘User submitting a score’ or ‘User submitting a CORRECT score’:

At the same time I set my ‘Score weighting’ for each page by looking at the ‘Score weighting’ section which is lower down in the ‘Scoring and completion’ tab.

I then added a number to this box, in this case I’m going to add ‘10000’ because I want my learner to earn 10000 points for every question they get correct:

This process needs to be repeated for each of my scored pages.

So at this point my project was all set up so that the score would calculate how I wanted, with a high score of 30000 points.

Next I need to set up my ‘Results’ page so that my learner can see their score.

To do this I entered the ‘Total score (number)’ clip (for more information on ‘Clips’ click here) into the text box on the right:

…this means that if my learner completes the course, the ‘Clip’ will automatically convert to the users score:

Give it a go and let me know how you get on, if you have any questions please get in touch!

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Adding a custom bullet point https://www.elucidat.com/blog/adding-a-custom-bullet-point/ Thu, 19 Mar 2015 00:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/adding-a-custom-bullet-point This week we’re going to take a look at adding a custom bulletpoint using the ‘Images in text’ function. Here’s an example I created. To create this example firstly I chose an icon, I used the website ‘Flaticon’ to find an icon. Next I added a text and image page (this will work with any […]

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This week we’re going to take a look at adding a custom bulletpoint using the ‘Images in text’ function.

Here’s an example I created.

To create this example firstly I chose an icon, I used the website ‘Flaticon’ to find an icon.

Next I added a text and image page (this will work with any page type as long as there is a text field).

Next I added some text:

Then I selected the area of text where I would like to add a bullet point:

…and then I pressed the ‘Image’ button in the text editor:

…then I uploaded my icon by dragging it onto this field:

…at this point I had one bulletpoint, but I wanted to have three:

…so I clicked the next area that I would like to add a bulletpoint:

I then pressed ‘Images’ again, but this time rather than uploading an image I chose ‘Launch image library’:

…in the image library, the image that I previously uploaded was in the ‘Your images’ section:

I clicked it and it was instantly added, using this ‘Image library’ is much quicker as you don’t have to wait whilst your image uploads.

I repeated the same technique for my final bulletpoint.

I hope you enjoyed this post, next week we’re going to look at personalising your courses.

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Colour theme picker https://www.elucidat.com/blog/colour-theme-picker/ Thu, 12 Mar 2015 04:37:06 +0000 https://blog.elucidat.com/?p=1215 This month we’ve added a nifty, time-saving tool, the ‘Colour theme picker’. The colour theme picker can be located at the bottom of your screen, just below the ‘In page audio’ box: Looks nice right!? When you select one of the colour options using the toggle it will change the colours throughout the project (don’t […]

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This month we’ve added a nifty, time-saving tool, the ‘Colour theme picker’.

The colour theme picker can be located at the bottom of your screen, just below the ‘In page audio’ box:

color theme picker 3

Looks nice right!?

When you select one of the colour options using the toggle it will change the colours throughout the project (don’t worry though, any colours you’ve changed yourself won’t be affected).

Take this for example, if I choose the second toggle my theme colours will change to this saucy boudoir colour scheme:

color theme picker 1

…or if I change to toggle number 4 I get this lovely peppermint ensemble:

color theme picker 2

…neato!

You can even set up your own colour themes by pressing the box of the item on the far right, here:

color theme picker 5

From here you can select a primary colour, a secondary colour, border radius and text size:

color theme picker 4

When you’ve selected your settings, press ‘Save Changes’ and your theme will change automatically.

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Collaborating with your colleagues https://www.elucidat.com/blog/collaborating-with-your-colleagues/ Wed, 04 Mar 2015 00:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/collaborating-with-your-colleagues One of Elucidat’s greatest assets (and one of the major advantages of Cloud based tools) is the way that it allows you to seamlessly work simultaneously with your colleagues far and wide. This week I wanted to look at a couple of our ‘collaboration’ features. Comments In Elucidat, any element that has an edit button […]

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One of Elucidat’s greatest assets (and one of the major advantages of Cloud based tools) is the way that it allows you to seamlessly work simultaneously with your colleagues far and wide. This week I wanted to look at a couple of our ‘collaboration’ features.

Comments

In Elucidat, any element that has an edit button on it can have a comment added to.

Simply right click the edit button:

Then add some text and press ‘Comment’:

Your colleagues will know a comment has been left as there will be this orange icon:

They will also be able to review all of the comments in the project by pressing the ‘Review’ tab:

Sending links to colleagues

With Elucidat, you can send links to specific pages for your colleagues to review,

Simply grab the URL when you are on the page you’d like to link to:

If you would like the page to open at a specific screen width add: ‘?width=’ and then enter a pixel width.

You can also send links to colleagues from in preview:

If you remove ‘Responsive_’ from the URL it will display in full screen.

I hope you enjoyed this quick look at collaboration, if you would like any more hints and tips on how to synchronise your team, or if you would like to request a collaboration feature please get in touch. In the meantime, why not have a look at our other collaboration features: ‘Gifting’ and ‘User roles’.

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Making a series of animated pages https://www.elucidat.com/blog/making-a-series-of-animated-pages/ Mon, 16 Feb 2015 00:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/making-a-series-of-animated-pages This week our quick tip will teach you how to make a series of animated images and pages. In this post you will learn about the ‘Animation’ button and ‘Timers’. Here’s an example of animation in Elucidat that I made. This technique is helpful: If you have a lot of text that you would like […]

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This week our quick tip will teach you how to make a series of animated images and pages. In this post you will learn about the ‘Animation’ button and ‘Timers’.

Here’s an example of animation in Elucidat that I made.

This technique is helpful:

  • If you have a lot of text that you would like to break up onto several pages.
  • If you want your project to work better on mobile, where there isn’t always space for long passages of text.
  • If you’d like to build up scenarios.

How I built this example

To begin with, I built my first page which I will use as the template for my other pages.

I chose to make this a ‘Text and Image/Multiple boxes’ page, as in the default themes this page type has animation controls on the text and image boxes.

Firstly I added my image and text:

Next I thought about how I’d like my text and image to animate in. I chose to have the man appear first and then the text appear after.

I double clicked the image so that all the edit buttons would display:

Then I chose the ‘Animation’ button:

I changed ‘Animate in’ to ‘Fade In’ so that my image will fade in when the page is opened, I didn’t need to change any of the other settings.

I then double clicked the text and opened it’s animation properties:

I added ‘Fade in’ again, but then I made one other small alteration, I changed delay to ‘1’ so that it would display a second after the man has appeared.

Once my template page had been made, I duplicated it twice (this saves me having to change these settings on the new pages).

I added a different image and text to each of the new pages. Once I had all my pages set up, my next step was to control how to animate between the pages.

Animating between pages

To animate between the 3 pages I used the timers feature, I started by opening page 1.

I then opened the ‘Page settings’ menu and selected the ‘Time limits’ tab:

Then where it says ‘Redirect to this page after the following time’ I added the length of time that I wanted to view the page for before moving to the next page.

In this case 5 seconds or 00:05.

Then I chose a page to redirect to once I have viewed my first page for 5 seconds, I chose page 2 in this case:

I pressed ‘Save page settings’ to save the changes for this page then I repeated the same steps on my second page but I changed the page to redirect to my third page:

…and there we go, a series of automatically advancing pages with animations. Give it a shot yourself, if you are feeling really fancy why not add a countdown to the page using the ‘Amount of time remaining on page’ ‘Clip’ (for more info about ‘Clips’ see here).

Next week we’re going to take a look at how to create a timed questionnaire, see you then!

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Making non-linear courses Part 3 https://www.elucidat.com/blog/making-non-linear-courses-part-3/ Wed, 04 Feb 2015 00:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/making-non-linear-courses-part-3 Good day! It’s time to conclude looking at making non-linear courses in Elucidat, this weeks focus is Achievements. Click here if you need a refresher on the course. Achievements At the end of my ‘Kitchen Etiquette’ course, my learner will be given a Badge if they achieve a pass. To set this I opened my […]

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Good day! It’s time to conclude looking at making non-linear courses in Elucidat, this weeks focus is Achievements.

Click here if you need a refresher on the course.

Achievements

At the end of my ‘Kitchen Etiquette’ course, my learner will be given a Badge if they achieve a pass.

To set this I opened my ‘Pass’ page, in this case called ‘Impressive!’ in order to assign an Achievement to this page:

Then I pressed ‘Page settings’ and selected the ‘Achievements’ tab.

At this point I had two options:

‘Choose a Badge to award when this page is completed’ – Here I can choose from previously uploaded Badge images or preset icons.

‘Or make a new Badge’ – Here I can choose my own image.

In this case, I chose a preset Badge and then saved, this Badge will now be earned once my learner opens the ‘Pass’ page.

Once this step was completed I had to choose somewhere for the Badge to appear in my course, in this example I chose to stick with the ‘Pass’ page, but you might want to try adding your Badges to other screens (for instance a trophy cabinet screen).

If you do add the image to any other page in your project it will appear greyed out until you view the page where the badge was assigned in the ‘Page settings’ menu using the process above.

To add the image to my page I double clicked the text box to open the text editor:

Then I clicked the ‘Badges’ button on the far right and selected the Achievement:

 

Now to Release!

At this point I conducted final tests to make sure that my links were set to the correct menus and that my rules where working.

Once I was happy I pressed ‘Release’ (if you would like to learn about Releasing click here) and my course was ready for my learners!

Thanks for reading about how to create non-linear content for Elucidat, next week I will be looking at how to create a series of animated pages.

If you have any questions then please add a comment below and I will respond to you.

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Making non-linear courses Part 2 https://www.elucidat.com/blog/making-non-linear-courses-part-2/ Wed, 21 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/making-non-linear-courses-part-2 Welcome back! This week we’re looking at how to link to different pages in your course. There are a couple of ways of doing this, let’s look at the easy one first! Adding links In Elucidat, any element that has a link button can be used to link to another page. In different themes, different […]

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Welcome back! This week we’re looking at how to link to different pages in your course.

There are a couple of ways of doing this, let’s look at the easy one first!

Adding links

In Elucidat, any element that has a link button can be used to link to another page.

In different themes, different elements have link buttons on them, but they are usually on the ‘Next/Previous’ buttons and the ‘Home’ button (see below).

‘Home’ button.

Next/Previous buttons.

After clicking the link button, select the page you would like to link to and press save, easy!

Linked menus

Another way of using link buttons is to select one of our ‘Menu’ page types. With these page types you can make a button, hotspot or image box into a link. In the example below I have linked the cupcake image to page 3 ‘Cupcake kerfuffle’ by clicking the link button, selecting page 3 and pressing save.

This is the technique that I used for most of my screens in my ‘Kitchen etiquette’ course.

Branching with Rules

Links are great in most circumstances, but what if I wanted a page to only display according to my learner’s accomplishments, for instance a pass or a fail. Well in this case, we need to look at ‘Branching’ using ‘Rules’. These settings can be accessed by pressing ‘Page settings’ and then choosing the ‘Rules’ tab.

In my ‘Kitchen etiquette’ course the ‘Result’ section is controlled by rules.

The ‘Result’ page will only show if the learner has viewed all three scenarios, otherwise the learner is redirected back to the ‘Before you enter the kitchen!…’ menu screen.

In order to do this I set the rules with ‘Pages seen’ set to the opening page of each scenario:

Once my learner has viewed all three modules and has opened the ‘Result’ screen they need to be shown either a ‘Pass’ or ‘Fail’ screen.

This can be done easily with rules, I opened the ‘Pass’ screen (called ‘Impressive!’ in this course) and added this rule:

…and for the ‘Fail’ screen (called ‘Oh dear!’ in this course) I added this rule:

This concludes Links and Branching, thank you for reading, next week we will take a look at the wonderful world of achievements.

For more info on the possibilities of Branching, see here.

 

 

 

Click here to see part 3 of this tutorial!

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Scenario based elearning: Making non-linear courses Part 1 https://www.elucidat.com/blog/making-non-linear-courses-part-1/ Wed, 14 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/making-non-linear-courses-part-1 Welcome! Over the coming weeks we’re going to look at how to create non-linear and branched courses quickly with Elucidat’s powerful Gamification tools. Week by week we will show you how to create my ‘Kitchen etiquette’ course from scratch. Click here to see the course. Here’s the order in which we will be covering each […]

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Welcome! Over the coming weeks we’re going to look at how to create non-linear and branched courses quickly with Elucidat’s powerful Gamification tools. Week by week we will show you how to create my ‘Kitchen etiquette’ course from scratch.

Click here to see the course.

Here’s the order in which we will be covering each section:

  • Week 1 we will cover writing a basic script.
  • Week 2 we will cover linking and branching.
  • Week 3 we will cover achievements.

Why use Branching?

Recently, we’ve seen more and more of our clients use branching in their E-learning. There are a few major benefits:

1.) With branching it’s very easy to chunk large modules and allow users to explore the content that is most appropriate to them. You can have content focussed at particular roles, for instance, have a separate branch for ‘Managers’ and a separate branch for ‘Staff’.

2.) With branching your learner can choose how in depth their learning needs to be – for instance a learner who already has the knowledge contained in a module can skip straight to the assessment, this means they can focus their energies more effectively.

3.) With branching you can easily create scenario based courses that respond to your learners actions, for instance a correct action might lead to them continuing down a different branch to an incorrect answer.

Scripting

Before you get in to making a non-linear course, it is vital to have a clear idea of how the user flow of your project is likely to work.

In my ‘Kitchen etiquette’ course, the aim is to allow the learner to select what order they would like to approach the module in and to teach them the consequences of their actions by showing them different pages according to their choices.

To begin with, I made a very basic paper flow chart that marks which pages my learner will be sent to according to their actions (see here for more tips on rapid prototyping).

Here is my very rough diagram that I made for this course (sorry about the terrible handwriting!)

Once I could understand the basic flow of the course I began scripting the pages. In this course I have 21 pages, we’re going to look at how I set up the branching for page 3, ‘Cupcake kerfuffle’ (Scenario 1 in my flow chart).

 

Page 3 is a single choice question that links to either a page congratulating your learner (if they select the correct answer) or a page informing the learner that they haven’t chosen the correct answer (which then redirects the learner back to the question to try again after a short recap).

Here is the script I wrote after making these conclusions:


Screen ID: 003 – Cupcake Kerfuffle

Screen type: Linked page

Question: A colleague has brought baked goods for all the office. Cookies, brownies and cake, jackpot! They have been left in the office kitchen with the note ‘Help yourself’. What does ‘Help yourself’ actually mean though? Choose your answer and then press submit.

Answer 1 (correct) – make this branch to page 004

Answer 2 (incorrect) – make this branch to page 005

Answer 3 (incorrect) – make this branch to page 005


Having a simple layout like this with the pages clearly marked is incredibly valuable both when setting up, conducting your final tests or if you intend to hand the script to a third party.

Hint: I recommend having numbered titles (e.g 003) so that it is easier to check your branching, in this case I also added ‘Good’ and ‘Bad’ to some of the titles for clarity.

Once I have written my script for all my pages I am ready to get building! Next week we will look at how to begin ‘Branching’ (the fun stuff!), if you would like to skip forward on your own have a look at these pages on ‘Branching’ and ‘Links’.

Click here to see part 2 of this tutorial!

 

 

 

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Adding images to text https://www.elucidat.com/blog/adding-images-to-text/ Tue, 13 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/adding-images-to-text This week we’ve added a really rather spectacular new function, you can now add images into text (particularly handy for when you want to explain page controls!) To start adding images into to text: Double click or press the edit button of a text box (it will be the inner edit button on most text […]

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This week we’ve added a really rather spectacular new function, you can now add images into text (particularly handy for when you want to explain page controls!)

To start adding images into to text:

Double click or press the edit button of a text box (it will be the inner edit button on most text boxes).

You should see the text edit menu open:

Click the image button:

Drag and drop your image or press ‘Choose file’ to upload.

Your image will now appear in your text box, voila!

Advanced options

Do you fancy getting a little more advanced? Read on!

Once your image has been uploaded, you can then edit it, firstly click the image whilst in edit mode, the image should become editable, like so:

Now if you drag the bottom right corner you will be able to resize your image.

If you click where it says ‘Edit’, a menu will open:

In here you can change a variety of options:

Title: This is the alternative text that will display for screen-readers, we recommend adding a title to increase the accessibility of your project.

Link: Use this option to make your image link to another screen (very useful for teaching the basics of navigation buttons!).

Position: Defines where the image will show in the text box.

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New xAPI/Tin Can mode https://www.elucidat.com/blog/new-xapi-tin-can-mode/ Tue, 13 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/new-xapi-tin-can-mode This month we’ve added a splendid new function that allows you to send information to an LRS using ‘xAPI’ or as it’s more commonly known ‘Tin Can’. Using an LRS saves your learners from the hassle of logging in to an LMS. They will love it! To find the new ‘Tin Can 1.0’ mode: Open […]

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This month we’ve added a splendid new function that allows you to send information to an LRS using ‘xAPI’ or as it’s more commonly known ‘Tin Can’.

Using an LRS saves your learners from the hassle of logging in to an LMS. They will love it!

To find the new ‘Tin Can 1.0’ mode:

  1. Open your project.
  2. Press ‘Configure’.
  3. Press ‘Learner tracking’.
  4. From the ‘Tracking mode’ dropdown select ‘Tin can 1.0’.

You will now be presented with several options:

Tin Can options: Here you can define the Endpoint URL, Username and password (for more information on what to enter here see our tutorial on ‘How to use Elucidat with SCORM Cloud’ below.)

Learner access control: Here you can control security settings for your course (this only applies to courses built in ‘Tin Can’ mode). When using ‘Tin Can’ mode you will need to choose the ‘Identify setting’, this means your learner will be required to enter their email address and then follow a link that is sent to them (you can even specify the domain that is required for the address to be accepted, if you require SSO please get in touch).

Once you have all of your settings in place, release your course.

How to use Elucidat with SCORM Cloud

Create a SCORM Cloud account (https://cloud.scorm.com).

Log in to SCORM Cloud.

Click the ‘LRS’ tab on the left of the screen.

In the box that says ‘LRS endpoints’ you will see 4 URLs. Copy the first one.

Open your course in Elucidat.

Press ‘Configure’.

Press the ‘Learner tracking’ tab.

Now from the ‘Tracking mode’ dropdown select ‘Tin Can 1.0’.

Now in the box titled ‘LRS Endpoint URL’ insert the URL that you copied from SCORM cloud, at the end of the URL add ‘statements’.

Your URL should look similar to this:

Head back to SCORM Cloud.

In the box titled ‘Activity Providers’ copy the code displayed next to ‘Key’ open Elucidat and this into the ‘User’ box. Do the same for ‘Secret’ (also in the ‘Activity Providers’ section) but copy this into the ‘LRS password’ box and then press ‘Save changes’.

Press ‘Show details’ and in the ‘Authentication type’ dropdown choose ‘Basic auth’.

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Achievements and Learner badges https://www.elucidat.com/blog/achievements-and-learner-badges/ Mon, 12 Jan 2015 00:00:00 +0000 https://elucidat.com/blog/achievements-and-learner-badges This month we’ve updated our ‘Achievements’ feature to help you incentivise your learners and further ‘Gamify’ your projects. ‘Achievements’ allow you to load an icon or picture (known as a ‘Badge’) that indicate that your learner has achieved a certain goal by reaching this page. ‘Achievements’ work very nicely with ‘Branching’. Previously, ‘Achievements’ were only […]

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This month we’ve updated our ‘Achievements’ feature to help you incentivise your learners and further ‘Gamify’ your projects.

‘Achievements’ allow you to load an icon or picture (known as a ‘Badge’) that indicate that your learner has achieved a certain goal by reaching this page. ‘Achievements’ work very nicely with ‘Branching’.

Previously, ‘Achievements’ were only available for Developer types, but now we can all enjoy them!

To find the ‘Achievements’ feature, press ‘Page Settings’, then press ‘Achievements’.

At this point you have two options:

‘Choose a Badge to award when this page is completed’ – Here you can choose from previously uploaded Badge images or preset icons.

‘Or make a new Badge’ – Here you can choose your own image. Enter a name, select the image to upload and then press ‘Add badge’.

…I chose to upload a Muffin to reward my learners, lucky!

Once you have completed the steps above, your achievement will have been set up for this page, but won’t be visible.

You will now want to add your image to appear somewhere in your project (this could be absolutely anywhere, a trophy cabinet style page, a hall of fame page, whatever you choose) this is done by inserting them into the text of the page.

Double click a text box or press the edit button to open the text editor:

Click the ‘Badges’ button on the far right.

You will now be able to choose your ‘Badges’:

Once clicked a code such as this will appear in text box: . When you enter preview the code will disappear and be replaced by your image.

Note: If your image is ‘Greyed out’ then this is because the particular page that the achievement has been set to has not been reached yet.

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